WIP Wednesday – Girl in a lamb hat

I said not too long ago that I didn’t have any interest in doing paid commission work… Meet Miss E, my first paid commission (of a crocheted piece, anyway). One of my coworkers saw some of my other dolls, and she asked me to make a doll that looks like her 18 month old daughter in her favorite lamb hat. I’ve been in a bit of a crochet funk lately, and it was nice to have inspiration given to me by someone else’s request.

I think I’ve finally perfected getting the dolls to stand freely: adding custom-cut bristol board “inserts” in the bottoms of the feet so that the soles stay flat. These are in addition to ball bearings and wadded up t-shirt strips as stuffing in the legs, both of which help weigh it down and maintain its center of gravity. I’m still trying to figure out the neck situation, though. I think it might be too thin, as the heads definitely flop around a bit. My first dolls didn’t have any necks, though, so the heads looked like eggs with faces on top of a pair of shoulders. Maybe a thicker neck is the key. And good lord, I have got to figure out an easier way to make mouths with embroidery floss.

WIP Wednesday: Van Gogh scarf

vincent_van_gogh_-_almond_blossom_-_google_art_project

Vincent van Gogh, Almond Blossoms. 1890. Oil on canvas. Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam. Source

This one is going to be a WIP for a while. I am attempting to emulate Vincent van Gogh’s Almond Blossoms painting in a scarf which, for the moment, means that I am making a blue scarf that will eventually have lots of flower appliqués on it. The base scarf is my bus-crochet project, since I don’t have to think much about what I am doing because it is just rows of double crochet stitches. What I’m trying to decide now is how to make the flowers.

When looking at the painting, the flowers appear to be almost white; however, after doing a little research on some of the preservation issues facing many of van Gogh’s paintings for another post I wrote, I thought that maybe the blossoms had originally been pink, but the red pigment has since faded. Being as anal as I am, I had to look up what real almond blossoms look like. As you can see, they are dark pink in the center and pale pink to white in the petals. The center also has a distinct greenish, star-shaped sepal (I think that’s the sepal…) around the pistil and stamens. From what I’ve read, almond blossoms are generally white, though some can be pink.

(Apologies for the excessive use of photo filters on the collage above– apparently I am less perceptive of yellow tones when I am half asleep on the bus in the morning). I found a nice sky blue yarn at Michael’s, and last night, I experimented with four different iterations of crocheted almond blossoms (although the pattern I did a couple of variations on, which is from 100 Flowers to Knit and Crochet by Leslie Stanfield, is supposed to be for a meconopsis flower). I’m thinking of going with 2 or 4 for the blossoms. 4 is slightly more work because it includes a slip stitch layer of light pink yarn on the outer edge of the fuchsia, which I have to admit is a little bit of a deterrent. I mean, I’m probably going to have to make 100 of these if I want to achieve the effect I am currently picturing, and crocheting through a slip stitch is kind of a pain. However, I feel like the fuchsia in 2 is too intense juxtaposed directly next to the white petals. I would love another opinion from anyone reading this post!